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Spezzatino

Spezzatino


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The recipe presented by Radu Popovici, in a project made by our Site together with Cirio - Italian Tradition from 1856. Radu Popovici is one of the most known and appreciated bloggers in the online culinary environment, and our Site is probably the best culinary site of the moment , with 500,000 unique visitors per month


Rabbit confit

When I first read the title of a confit recipe, it seemed to me that it was a pretentious food, which would last an eternity until it was ready and which needed many, many ingredients. I imagined that it was very complicated and that there was no point in wasting my time with such a recipe. So I gave up on the idea, I didn't even read the whole recipe. Last year I reconsidered my decision and decided to try a rabbit confit recipe. I searched for more recipes and I liked Michael Psilakis' recipe from How to Roast a Lamb: New Greek Classic Cooking (Little, Brown) the most. So I got to work. The more complicated I thought it would be, the easier it is. It's not a meal to make during the week for dinner, but it's not scary either. The truth is that it is not at all complicated to prepare a confit, but it takes a little longer until the final result is on the plate, but it is worth every minute of waiting.

ingredients

  • 200 ml dry or semi-dry white wine
  • enough water to cover the meat
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 2-3 sprigs of thyme
  • 2 juniper berries
  • 3 threads of lemon verbena
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 green onion
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 4 cloves
  • 15-20 mixed peppercorns
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 cardamom powder
  • 5 sprigs of thyme
  • 2-3 rosemary sprigs
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • salt
  • 250 ml of olive oil

Method of preparation

The rabbit meat is sliced, peeled, washed with cold water and wiped with a paper towel. The meat is placed in a glass bowl or in a ceramic tray.

All the ingredients for the marinade (stain) are mixed and poured directly over the rabbit meat. Top up with water until the meat is completely covered. Cover the bowl or tray with cling film and refrigerate for 10-12 hours.

After marinating long enough, the rabbit meat is removed from the stain and left to drain for a few minutes.

Prepare a cast iron or ceramic pot with a lid.

The oven is heated to 140 o C.

Place the meat in a bowl, grease with a little olive oil, sprinkle salt on top and then put sliced ​​green onions, garlic cut in half, cloves, bay leaves, pepper, anise, thyme, rosemary, cardamom powder and mustard seeds. Add the oil mixture to the bowl, over the meat and ingredients. The oil should cover about 1-1.5 cm of the meat.

Cover the bowl with a lid and place in the oven. Check the contents periodically, do not lower the oil too much (it should not boil too much), possibly lower the temperature in the oven.

The meat is cooked in the oven at low temperature for about 3 hours, until tender.


Attitudes towards horse meat

Horse meat is commonly consumed in many countries in Europe and Asia. It is not a food generally available in some English-speaking countries, such as the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, Ireland, the United States and English Canada. It is also taboo in Brazil, Poland, Israel and among the Roma people and Jews around the world. Horse meat is not generally consumed in Spain, except in the north, but the country exports horses both as live animals and meat slaughtered for the French and Italian markets. Horse meat is consumed in some countries in North America and Latin America, but it is illegal in some other countries. The definition of "meat" in the Australian and New Zealand Code of Food Standards does not include horse. In Tonga, horse meat is consumed nationally, and Tongan emigrants living in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia have retained their taste, claiming that Christian missionaries originally introduced them.

In Islam, the consumption of horse meat is not cursed , but only makrooh , which means it should be avoided, but eating it is not a sin like eating pork. Horse meat consumption has been common in Central Asian societies, past or present, due to the abundance of steppes suitable for horse breeding. In North Africa, horse meat was occasionally eaten, but almost exclusively by Hannah Sunnis (without reference) it was never eaten in the Maghreb.

Horse meat is forbidden by Jewish dietary laws because horses do not have split hooves and are not ruminant.

In the eighth century, Popes Gregory III and Zacharias instructed St. Boniface, a German missionary, to forbid the consumption of horse meat by those he converted, due to his association with German pagan ceremonies. The people of Iceland have reportedly expressed reluctance to embrace Christianity for some time, largely due to the abandonment of horse meat. Horse meat is now eaten in Iceland, and many horses are bred for this purpose. Culturally close people in Sweden still have an ambivalent attitude towards horse meat, it is said to come from this edict.

Henry Mayhew describes the difference in acceptability and use of the horse carcass between London and Paris in London Labor and the London Poor (1851). Horse meat was rejected by the British, but continued to be eaten in other European countries, such as France and Germany, where knackers often sold horse carcasses, despite a papal ban. Even the hunting of wild horses for meat continued in the Westphalia area. Londoners also suspected that horse meat found its way into sausages and that entrails sold like beef were, in fact, equine.

Although there is no taboo regarding the consumption of horse meat in itself , is generally considered by ethnic Russians a poor quality meat with poor taste and is rarely found in stores.

It is popular among these historically nomadic peoples such as the Tartars, Yakuts, Kyrgyz and Kazakhs.

Taboos

In 732 AD, Pope Gregory III began a concerted effort to stop the ritual consumption of horse meat in pagan practice. In some countries, the effects of this ban by the Roman Catholic Church have persisted, and the prejudices of horse meat have progressed from taboos to avoidance to hatred. In a study by Fred Simoons, avoiding horse meat in American culture is less likely due to persistent feelings of Gregory's ban, but instead due to ignorance of the meat compared to more common offerings. In other parts of the world, horse meat has the stigma of being something that poor people eat and is seen as a cheap substitute for other meats, such as pork and beef.

According to anthropologist Marvin Harris, some crops classify horse meat as taboo because the horse turns grass into less effective meat than ruminants.

The totem taboo is also a possible reason for refusing to eat horse meat as daily food, but it does not necessarily rule out slaughter and ritual consumption. Roman sources claim that the goddess Epona was widely worshiped in Gaul and southern Britain. Epona, a triple-looking goddess, was the protector of the horse and horse owners, and her horses were sacrificed, she was in parallel with the Irish Macha and Welsh Rhiannon. Into the The white goddess , Robert Graves claimed that the taboo between the British and their descendants was due to the worship of Epona and even previous rites. Uffington White Horse is probably evidence of ancient horse worship. The ancient Indian Kshatriya engaged in horse sacrifices (Ashwamedh Yaghya) as recorded in the Vedas and Ramayana, but in the context of ritual sacrifice, he is not "killed," but instead suffocated to death. In 1913, the Finnic Mari people of the Volga region were observed practicing horse sacrifice.

In ancient Scandinavia, the horse was very important, as a living creature, working, as a sign of the status of owner and symbolic in the old Nordic religion. Horses were sacrificed as a sacrifice to the gods, and meat was eaten by people who attended religious festivals. When the Nordic countries were Christianized, the consumption of horse meat was considered a sign of paganism and was banned. Reluctance to eat horse meat is common in these countries even today.


Buffet from Rodizio Cluj

For 50 lei, you also choose you eat until you are full from: tropical salad with shrimp, potato salad with onion and tuna, tricolor pasta salad, peasant salad of green pods, peppers and cherry tomatoes, potato salad, eggs, olives and mayonnaise, Russian salad, Paella Valenceana, spezzatino meat, brazilian feijoada with basmati rice, italian cheeses, italian sausages, french fries, potato croquettes, baked potatoes, steamed vegetable mix, mixed salad, fried polenta, fried banana, brazilian bread, vinagr, bread sos sweet chilly.


Starting with this competition week, two prizes will be awarded each week, one for participants who choose a product from the Helios Healthy Cosmetics group and another for participants who choose a product from the Healthy Foods group. Participants & hellip Continue reading & rarr

These sheets can be used in a variety of recipes but also as a substitute for bread and if we prepare a larger amount we can keep them in the refrigerator for up to 30 days. Flax seeds contain high quality protein & hellip Continue reading & rarr


Sweet and sour onions / Sweet and sour chives

Chives are often used in food, not only throughout the Mediterranean, but wherever a Greek, an Italian or a Frenchman has chosen to live his life. I often say that its use is not a great miracle and can cross anyone's mind. However, they quite often choose it as a basic garnish or component, sometimes even the main one.

In the original version, boret cipolline are used, a special species cultivated in Reggio Emilia since 1400. The variety itself is a small, flat one, with a special aroma. However, to give you a fairly close idea, I say, they can be replaced with chives, which are easier to find.

This chopped pan with honey and balsamic vinegar is one of the joys of the quiet life of the Italian from anywhere.

Sweet and sour onions can be used as an appetizer in addition to cheeses and sausages, but the role of their life is to garnish, especially meat-based dishes, such as ispzatino di manzo, a wonderful beef stew. The one I made is pork because of Mimi from the Italian cheese factory, one of the main tasters of this blog who, in the ancestral Romanian tradition, does not put his mouth on the beef in the yard. Among Romanians, she was an important member of the family. # iloveolteniaprofundă

What I tell you before the recipe is that the chives will be easier to clean if you leave it for half an hour in a bowl of water.


When we talk about Barbecue, we do not mean a simple grilled meat. Churrasco is a symbol of Brazilian cuisine, with carefully sectioned meat, prepared according to typical recipes, marinated to give it a special tenderness and taste.

Churrasco is prepared on the sword and cooked on hot coals. A real grill is made from charcoal & # 8230 in my opinion and not only. All of South America, Central America and many European countries prove this to us.

You eat as much as you want, for 80 lei, from seven types of meat: Brazilian salsiccia, chicken breast with bacon, chicken legs, pork tenderloin, pork ribs, beef tenderloin, picanha and buffet perfectly complemented by Giada & # 8217s sweet pineapple dessert.

The concept is quite simple: you have a ball with two colors (green and red). As long as he has a green face, the waiter comes to you and keeps serving you. The moment you turn it upside down, you signal that you don't want it anymore, as a result it doesn't serve you anymore.


Attitudes towards horse meat

Horse meat is commonly consumed in many countries in Europe and Asia. It is not a food generally available in some English-speaking countries, such as the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, Ireland, the United States and English Canada. It is also taboo in Brazil, Poland, Israel and among the Roma people and Jews around the world. Horse meat is not generally consumed in Spain, except in the north, but the country exports horses as both live animals and slaughtered meat to the French and Italian markets. Horse meat is consumed in some countries in North America and Latin America, but it is illegal in some other countries. The definition of "meat" in the Australian and New Zealand Code of Food Standards does not include horse. In Tonga, horse meat is consumed nationally, and Tongan emigrants living in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia have retained their taste, claiming that Christian missionaries originally introduced them.

In Islam, the consumption of horse meat is not cursed , but only makrooh , which means it should be avoided, but eating it is not a sin like eating pork. Horse meat consumption has been common in Central Asian societies, past or present, due to the abundance of steppes suitable for horse breeding. In North Africa, horse meat was occasionally eaten, but almost exclusively by Hannah Sunnis (without reference) it was never eaten in the Maghreb.

Horse meat is forbidden by Jewish dietary laws because horses do not have split hooves and are not ruminant.

In the eighth century, Popes Gregory III and Zacharias instructed St. Boniface, a German missionary, to forbid the consumption of horse meat by those he converted, due to his association with German pagan ceremonies. The people of Iceland have reportedly expressed reluctance to embrace Christianity for some time, largely due to the abandonment of horse meat. Horse meat is now eaten in Iceland, and many horses are bred for this purpose. Culturally close people in Sweden still have an ambivalent attitude towards horse meat, it is said to come from this edict.

Henry Mayhew describes the difference in acceptability and use of the horse carcass between London and Paris in London Labor and the London Poor (1851). Horse meat was rejected by the British, but continued to be eaten in other European countries, such as France and Germany, where knackers often sold horse carcasses, despite a papal ban. Even the hunting of wild horses for meat continued in the Westphalia area. Londoners also suspected that horse meat found its way into sausages and that entrails sold like beef were, in fact, equine.

Although there is no taboo regarding the consumption of horse meat in itself , is generally considered by ethnic Russians a poor quality meat with poor taste and is rarely found in stores.

It is popular among these historically nomadic peoples such as the Tartars, Yakuts, Kyrgyz and Kazakhs.

Taboos

In 732 AD, Pope Gregory III began a concerted effort to stop the ritual consumption of horse meat in pagan practice. In some countries, the effects of this ban by the Roman Catholic Church have persisted, and the prejudices of horse meat have progressed from taboos to avoidance to hatred. In a study by Fred Simoons, avoiding horse meat in American culture is less likely due to persistent feelings of Gregory's ban, but instead due to ignorance of the meat compared to more common offerings. In other parts of the world, horse meat has the stigma of being something that poor people eat and is seen as a cheap substitute for other meats, such as pork and beef.

According to anthropologist Marvin Harris, some crops classify horse meat as taboo because the horse turns grass into less effective meat than ruminants.

The totem taboo is also a possible reason for refusing to eat horse meat as daily food, but it does not necessarily rule out slaughter and ritual consumption. Roman sources claim that the goddess Epona was widely worshiped in Gaul and southern Britain. Epona, a triple-looking goddess, was the protector of the horse and horse owners, and her horses were sacrificed, she was in parallel with the Irish Macha and Welsh Rhiannon. Into the The white goddess , Robert Graves claimed that the taboo between the British and their descendants was due to the worship of Epona and even previous rites. Uffington White Horse is probably evidence of ancient horse worship. The ancient Indian Kshatriya engaged in horse sacrifices (Ashwamedh Yaghya) as recorded in the Vedas and Ramayana, but in the context of ritual sacrifice, he is not "killed" but instead suffocated to death. In 1913, the Finnic Mari people of the Volga region were observed practicing horse sacrifice.

In ancient Scandinavia, the horse was very important, as a living creature, working, as a sign of the status of owner and symbolic in the old Nordic religion. Horses were sacrificed as a sacrifice to the gods, and meat was eaten by people who attended religious festivals. When the Nordic countries were Christianized, the consumption of horse meat was considered a sign of paganism and was banned. Reluctance to eat horse meat is common in these countries even today.


Beef spezzatino or beef stew with parmesan dumplings

A few months ago I didn't know exactly what to prepare for dinner, to change the menu a bit and do something special. I kept looking on the internet for various recipes, some of which were more interesting, but I didn't resonate with anything at the time. All was well, but I had no desire for anything. I didn't want any steaks, no rolls, no pasta, no pizza… I didn't like anything anymore. Until I came across a recipe that caught my eye: Italian beef stew. Suddenly I knew this was what we were going to eat for dinner. I read a few more recipes for this dish and got to work. At the end, a special stew came out, which I served with Parmesan dumplings.

After I finished assembling the table, I went to the office to write down my recipe, so as not to forget how I prepared this stew. I wrote down on about 3 different sheets (as I had listed the recipes I was inspired by) and I wrote something in the notebook. And that's how it all remained, until the last few days when I remembered what a good stew I made then and I wanted to repeat the experience. This time the first step was to write my recipe from start to finish, and only then did I start working in the kitchen.

To be sure that the next time I feel like spezzatino di manzo I will go straight to work in the kitchen I decided to put the recipe on the site. So you can try my beef stew recipe with parmesan dumplings.

ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped (¼ cup)
  • 1 grated carrot (½ cup)
  • 2 cloves of crushed garlic
  • ¼ cup of flour
  • 500 g diced beef (muscle + leg)
  • ¾ teaspoon of salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 2 red cups cleaned of skin and cut into cubes
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 2 teaspoons thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 300 g mushroom mushrooms
  • 2 carrots

For parmesan dumplings - 10-12 pieces

  • 65 g butter
  • 125g flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ cup of freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • 50 ml milk

Method of preparation

Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a high skillet. Add finely chopped onion and grated carrot. Saute for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the crushed garlic to the pan and mix well with the onion and carrot. After a minute, take the pan off the heat and set it aside.

Season the meat with salt and pepper.

Put the flour in a wide and deep plate. Pass the meat through the flour, so that it is covered with a thin film.

In another pan (as large as the diameter) put the other two tablespoons of olive oil and let it heat up. Put the meat and lightly fry on all sides, until slightly browned, about 5-6 minutes.

Remove the meat to a plate.

Put the wine in the pan where the meat was fried and let it boil, stirring from time to time, until the amount is reduced by half (3-4 minutes).

Put the meat and the wine reduction in the first pan, over the sauteed vegetables, and place the pan on the fire again.

Add the tomatoes, water, oregano, thyme and bay leaf. Cover the pan with a lid and simmer, stirring occasionally. Let it boil for about 45-50 minutes.

While the stew is boiling, peel the mushrooms and carrots and cut them into slices.

Remove the lid from the pan and add the mushrooms and carrots. Let the stew, uncovered, simmer for an hour or until the meat is very soft, well cooked.

In the meantime, get ready parmesan dumplings.

Put the butter, diced flour, flour, baking powder, salt and freshly grated Parmesan cheese in the food processor. Use the pulse function several times until a crumb-like composition is obtained. With the engine running, slowly pour the milk until the composition forms a ball.

When the dough has taken the shape of a ball, stop the robot, take out the dough on a board and divide it into 10-12 equal pieces. The dumplings are formed (about the size of a golf ball).

When there are only 10 minutes left until the stew is well cooked, place the dumplings on top, cover the pan with a lid and let it simmer for 10-12 minutes.

When the stew is well cooked and the dumplings are ready, remove the bay leaf and add more salt to taste.


Sweet and sour onions / Sweet and sour chives

Chives are often used in food, not only throughout the Mediterranean, but wherever a Greek, an Italian or a Frenchman has chosen to live his life. I often say that its use is not a great miracle and can cross anyone's mind. However, they often choose it as a basic garnish or component, sometimes even the main one.

In the original version, boret cipolline are used, a special species cultivated in Reggio Emilia since 1400. The variety itself is a small, flat one, with a special aroma. However, to give you a fairly close idea, I say, they can be replaced with chives, which are easier to find.

This chopped pan with honey and balsamic vinegar is one of the joys of the quiet life of the Italian from anywhere.

Sweet and sour onions can be used as an appetizer in addition to cheeses and sausages, but the role of their life is to garnish, especially meat-based dishes, such as ispzatino di manzo, a wonderful beef stew. The one I made is pork because of Mimi from the Italian cheese factory, one of the main tasters of this blog who, in the ancestral Romanian tradition, does not put his mouth on the beef in the yard. Among Romanians, she was an important member of the family. # iloveolteniaprofundă

What I tell you before the recipe is that the chives will be easier to clean if you leave it for half an hour in a bowl of water.


Sardin & # 8211 Oasis of Beauty from New Times

With the building of the blocks of flats by the town halls, restaurants as a center began to appear in the neighborhoods. Somewhere in the Timpuri Noi area, on the tram line 1, I discovered the Sardinian fish restaurant. It can be seen from the way you approach it that it is not a simple neighborhood restaurant, but that a lot of work has been done in arranging it. The style of Cristian Corvin, the designer and architect who made Biutiful, Divan, Bread and Wine and many others can be seen with the naked eye here as well.

If you don't want to eat, you can just sit with a glass of Terra Romana roses or their huge Gin Bombay Tonic Supreme in which a slice of grapefruit floats, leaving its aromas. And if you're still here, we invite you for a walk to enjoy the decor with all the fine details: chandeliers with brass teapots, kitchen utensils, ceramic objects or bottles, custom walls with choppers, twists or pans. In addition, Sardin follows the current trend with the open kitchen, so you can see chef Radu and his army of assistants working hard on the dishes.

If you choose to eat, you will receive from the house an appetizer with fried mozzarella balls, unfortunately not the greatest, a selection of green olives and a plate with a selection of bread, from the one that gives you endorphins at every bite and some crunchy and delicious sticks.

I took a plate of Italian sausages, from which I remembered a type of prosciutto like a veil, a kind of delicately cut bacon and the intense taste of a salami that seemed to be Milan.

I chose it as an appetizer marinated anchovies whose presentation we liked, being placed on the edge of a bowl, and the combination of radish sauce on the bottom of the container, in an almost precise amount, enough to reach you for each anchovy was a happy one. Hamsia almost melts in your mouth, and the sauce comes with the strong sour and intense element.

I also tried the antipasto goose foie gras terrine, fragrant and tasty, a little greasy, but balanced by the smoked goose breast and the aromatic herbs in the composition. We greased our slice of toast with onion jam and almost forgot the weight of the foie gras.

The same main I went first on the simple with a portion of pasta Alla Amatriciana with pancetta, tomatoes, onions and a Parmesan cheese like I've never seen before, one with a really crunchy texture. We liked the consistency of the pasta, which is homemade, and the good taste given by the simple ingredients used.

A small main course, lasagna with vegetables, proved to be incredibly satisfying and good. The mix of homemade lasagna sheets, with cream of Italian cheeses and seasonal vegetables, make this dish one worth returning to Sardinia. Don't be fooled by the weight!

I chose code file with squid and olives to be the first kind of fish tested. The tomato sauce and the peperoncino pepper complete the code and make it tasty, and the squid you use will delight you, especially since they are not the classic ones you can find in most restaurants.

Seafood stew she seems to be the star of the restaurant, especially since you have tiger shrimp, clams, atypical squid and fish together, all on a bed of mashed peas. The combination is a tasty one, but we had some questions about the texture of the shrimp, which were a little too gelatinous and we didn't really want to eat them with gusto, and the taste of the puree, which made us think of the taste mashed potato flakes.

For dessert I tried until cotta with fresh strawberry sauce, a refreshing and light dish, where I fully felt the aroma of unexpectedly fresh and fragrant fruit at the end of summer.

Sardin is a restaurant that attracts the middle and high class of Bucharest and if it goes beyond the food hop, that it fails to deliver a completely delicious meal because each delicious dish is balanced with a less spectacular one, it can become more than a Incredible bidder restaurant.



Comments:

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