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Best Cherries Jubilee Recipes

Best Cherries Jubilee Recipes


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Cherries Jubilee Shopping Tips

There are so many varieties of chocolate on the shelves today it can be overwhelming to pick one – as a general rule of thumb, the fewer the ingredients, the better the chocolate.

Cherries Jubilee Cooking Tips

Think beyond cakes and pies – fruits like peaches, pineapple, and figs are excellent grilled – brush with melted butter or wine and sprinkle with sugar and spices for a dessert that you can feel good about.


Cherries Jubilee

Melt butter in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Add cherries and salt stir to coat. Cook cherries, stirring occasionally, until juices are released and begin to reduce slightly, about 10 minutes. Remove pan from heat and stir in bourbon. Return pan to heat and simmer until juices thicken, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with lemon juice. Let cool slightly.

Step 2

Spoon warm cherry mixture over ice cream.

How would you rate Cherries Jubilee?

This was my first time making Cherries Jubilee. Unfortunately, the butter and brown sugar combination - while a perfect combination for bananas - took away the tartness of the cherries (even with the lemon juice added). A different recipe with just white sugar, vanilla and lemon juice (instead of the butter & brown sugar) worked much better.

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Cherry recipes

The cherry is a fruit that comes in both sweet and sour varieties, both of which are used for culinary purposes, although the sweeter version is generally preferred for raw eating. Fresh, ripe cherries are best enjoyed in Britain during the prime of summer, but the dried variety are also great to have on hand year-round. The cherry has a beautiful, deep, rich flavour of varying tartness, depending on the cultivar and the individual fruit itself, and are thus often paired with alcohol (cherry brandy or kirsch are prime examples).

In savoury dishes, duck and pork in particular, do well with their heavier flavours offset by the sweetness and bite of cherries. Mark Jordan garnishes his honey-roasted breast of duck with griottine cherries, while Nuno Mendes’ pork secretos with artichokes and red wine tapioca recipe is adorned with kirsch-soaked cherries for a spectacular finish.

The Black Forest gâteau from Stephen Crane illustrates how well cherries work with chocolate to make a classic dessert cake. For something a little less rich, but still quite luxurious, Pascal Aussignac's griotte cherry clafoutis is gorgeous as a dessert or for a French-inspired tea. Matthew Tomkinson's cherries jubilee with vanilla and yoghurt panna cotta is another notable dessert.


Cherry Jubilee Blondies I deem these Paleo crack bars. As in, can’t eat just one, and threatening to eat the entire pan in one sitting. These Paleo Cherry Jubilee Blondies are all that’s right in the world of fruit desserts. Blondies are a lot like brownies, obviously without the chocolate. But trust me they make up for it. They still maintain that gooey texture (you know the one) and have a nice soft chew. They have a caramel, almost butterscotch flavor. This flavor is very similar to brown butter shortbread, one of our most favorite things of all time. This goodness is also seen in our Salted Malted Walnut Brown Butter Shortbread Bars. Let me tell you, Garett and I both love these things. Actually, everyone we give these bars to loves them. But there’s one small problem – they aren’t Paleo. Which means this girl can’t enjoy them. And let’s be honest, it’s all about me. Which leads us to why I’ve been on a mission to find a Paleo alternative. I crave that nutty, buttery, rich flavor. And friends, these deliver on that promise. Not only that, but they feature one of the best stone fruits of the season, fresh cherries. Raise your hand if you are a fellow cherry fan. I feel like cherries can get a bad rap sometimes. Is it because they are slightly high maintenance? Granted, they have to be pitted. And while not an altogether fun activity, the end result is most certainly worth the effort. We are a cherry family. I am sure it has everything to do with growing up in the Midwest, and our close proximity to some of the best cherries in the country. Another thing we can thank Michigan for. This family favorite fruit makes appearances on our dinner tables all throughout the summer. Typically, we use sour cherries for most desserts, but sweet cherries are nothing to be ignored. Especially when they are mixed with tart lemon and cooked down with Brandy and honey. All of which caramelize into a rich luscious jam. And a quick, sugar-free jam, at that. It is hard to believe that the blondie batter, the nutty, gooey, brownie-like goodness that enrobes the jam, is free of gluten, grains, dairy, and refined sugar. I mean, does life get better than this? Or at least life in the way of healthier fruit desserts? We think not. And there’s something about handheld desserts that are so enticing. They feel less formal, more casual and comfortable, and are great for a party. Serve up a tray of these at your next gathering, and watch everyone fight for the last bite. These Cherry Jubilee Blondies will have everyone cheering for cherry season.

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To make this, you’ll need:

Spiced Apple Creme Brulee

What others are saying about this recipe

Have wanted to try this and found a recipe that is quick and easy.

Great fall variation for creme brûlée!

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Best Cherries Jubilee Recipes - Recipes

Cherries Jubilee is a classic flaming dessert, alleged to have been developed by Auguste Escoffier, the famous French chef. Historians are unsure when this spectacular dish was actually developed, but agree that it was for one of Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebrations – either her Golden Jubilee (1887) or her Diamond Jubilee (1897). Nowadays, when Cherries Jubilee is ordered at a restaurant, it is flamed and spooned over vanilla ice cream, but Escoffier’s actual recipe does not mention ice cream. One can only assume that this important detail was inadvertently left out of the recipe.

Cherries Jubilee is an easy dish to prepare, and has only five ingredients. This recipe calls for canned cherries because fresh ones are not always available. If you want to substitute fresh cherries, directions are given below. I have adapted this recipe to be prepared in the microwave because it is so much faster. You may prepare it on top of the stove if it is more convenient. The flaming, takes a little practice, which gives all of us a good excuse to make Cherries Jubilee several times before actually serving it to our guests.

Classic Cherries Jubilee

1 15 oz. can pitted dark cherries
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar

1 quart highest quality vanilla ice cream, preferably homemade

  1. Drain the cherries into a microwaveable bowl.
  2. Whisk the cornstarch, lemon juice, and sugar into the cherry juice.
  3. Microwave 2 minutes whisk until smooth.
  4. Microwave for an additional 1-3 minutes or until boiling.
  5. Remove from the microwave and whisk until smooth.
  6. Stir in the cherries.
  7. Scoop the ice cream into 6 bowls.
  8. Pour the kirsch into a small skillet and heat until it begins to bubble on the sides, swirling so that all of it heats.
  9. Remove from the heat, ignite (a long-necked barbecue lighter works best), and pour the flaming liqueur over the cherries.
  10. Spoon or pour the cherry mixture over the six bowls of ice cream. This is much easier to do when the flaming stops, but is more spectacular while it is still burning.
  • To use fresh cherries: wash and pit 1 pound of sweet cherries place them in a skillet with 1/2 cup sugar.
  • Squeeze 1/2 of a lemon over the cherries and cook over medium heat until the sugar has completely dissolved into the cherry juices.
  • Remove from the heat and proceed with the recipe above.

Nutrient Amount per Serving
Total Fat 11 g
Saturated Fat 7 g
Cholesterol 44 mg
Sodium 90 mg
Total Carbohydrate 51 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
Sugars 8 g
Protein 4 g

Vitamin A 10% Vitamin C 6% Calcium 0% Iron 3%

Content copyright © 2021 by Karen Hancock. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Karen Hancock. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Karen Hancock for details.


Cherry recipes

The cherry is a fruit that comes in both sweet and sour varieties, both of which are used for culinary purposes, although the sweeter version is generally preferred for raw eating. Fresh, ripe cherries are best enjoyed in Britain during the prime of summer, but the dried variety are also great to have on hand year-round. The cherry has a beautiful, deep, rich flavour of varying tartness, depending on the cultivar and the individual fruit itself, and are thus often paired with alcohol (cherry brandy or kirsch are prime examples).

In savoury dishes, duck and pork in particular, do well with their heavier flavours offset by the sweetness and bite of cherries. Mark Jordan garnishes his honey-roasted breast of duck with griottine cherries, while Nuno Mendes’ pork secretos with artichokes and red wine tapioca recipe is adorned with kirsch-soaked cherries for a spectacular finish.

The Black Forest gâteau from Stephen Crane illustrates how well cherries work with chocolate to make a classic dessert cake. For something a little less rich, but still quite luxurious, Pascal Aussignac's griotte cherry clafoutis is gorgeous as a dessert or for a French-inspired tea. Matthew Tomkinson's cherries jubilee with vanilla and yoghurt panna cotta is another notable dessert.


These Jarred Sour Cherries Should Live In Your Pantry

Most canned fruit should be ignored on the grocery store shelf, left to sit in its thick, sugary, gloppy syrup. The one exception? Sour cherries. (Okay, so they usually come in a glass jar, but it’s the same idea.)

Sour cherries are a variety of cherry that are, as their name suggests, tart and sour. Like their sweeter counterparts, sour cherries are only around for a couple of months in May and June, when we fill our tote bags with them. But unlike their sweeter counterparts, they’re too acidic to eat fresh out of hand, unless you like to pucker up. We like to pit them and bake them in pies and other summer desserts (even this pizza!). When you don’t have time (or patience) to pit pounds of cherries, or get caught out of season and can’t find them—go to the jar. Jarred cherries are available all year round and will impart the same flavor to whatever you’re cooking.

Who needs sprinkles when you have beautifully tart sour cherries?

There are several brands out there, but senior food editor Chris Morocco is partial to Trader Joe’s Dark Morello Cherries in Light Syrup (Morello is a variety of sour cherries), which, you can find online.

“No matter the brand, the most important thing is that they must come in a light syrup,” Morocco says. “If it’s a heavy syrup, that means they’ll be coated in an ultra-thick, ultra-sweet liquid. Light syrup is just mildly sweetened water, perfect for containing the cherries but not turning the whole jar into a viscous, tooth-ache-inducing mess. The cherries retain their shape and biting flavor, and you can easily drain them before you use them.”

Drained, they’re still quite sour, though toned down from being packed in sugar syrup, which is why we like to use them for baking. They’re a great sub for rhubarb in this Buckwheat Rhubarb and Strawberry Galette, since rhubarb isn’t the most readily available produce. You can toss them in sugar and throw them in a cake, like this Easy One Bowl Upside Down Cake. They’re fantastic in pies, or mixed into yogurt for breakfast. Try cooking them down with some sugar and water, giving them a compote-like consistency to spoon over ice cream. They’re truly the cherry on top.


The best cherries have taut, shiny skin. Look closely!

A peppy cherry dressing is a natural pairing for pork.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Bon Appétit may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


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